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Superior antibacterial action and reduced incidence of bacterial resistance in minocycline compared to tetracycline-treated acne patients.

PMID: 2138493  

Twenty-five previously untreated acne patients were monitored throughout a 6-month course of therapy with either tetracycline or minocycline for changes in the numbers of staphylococci, propionibacteria and yeasts of the genus Malessezia on the skin surface. Antibiotic resistant staphylococci and propionibacteria were also counted. Minocycline (50 mg b.d.) produced a 10-fold greater reduction in propionibacterial numbers compared to tetracycline (500 mg b.d.) after 12 (P less than 0.02, t-test) and 24 weeks (P less than 0.05) of therapy. As treatment progressed, propionibacteria were replaced by yeasts, numbers of which were significantly increased by week 12 (P less than 0.02) in tetracycline-treated patients and by week 24 (P less than 0.01) in minocycline-treated patients. This suggests that yeasts have no role in the pathogenesis of acne but may compete with propionibacteria for the same niche. Overgrowth of antibiotic resistant staphylococci prevented any decrease in staphylococcal numbers in tetracycline-treated patients, but minocycline produced a significant and sustained reduction in staphylococcal numbers after 1 week of therapy (P less than 0.001). An increase in the number of multiply resistant (greater than or equal to 3 resistances) staphylococci occurred in 67% of tetracycline-treated and 33% of minocycline-treated patients by the end of the treatment period. There was no evidence of propionibacterial resistance in either treatment group. This study shows that minocycline has much greater antibacterial activity in vivo against both staphylococci and propionibacteria and produces less staphylococcal antibiotic resistance than tetracycline.

Eady EA,  Cove JH,  Holland KT,  Cunliffe WJ

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