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Comparison of salicylic acid 30% peel and pneumatic broadband light in the treatment of mild to moderately severe facial acne vulgaris.

PMID: 28873106  

Acne patients experience not only a medical disease but also an aesthetic condition, and this latter complication greatly motivates patients to seek out the best treatment regimen to hasten improvement in their appearance. The available clinical procedures for acne treatment include salicylic acid 30% peel and pneumatic broadband light (PBBL). The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of salicylic acid 30% peel and PBBL treatments in patients with mild to moderately severe facial acne vulgaris. Twelve patients were recruited for a 12-week prospective, single-blind, randomized, split-face study. Patients were treated with a salicylic acid 30% peel on one side of the face and PBBL treatment was administered on the opposite side of the face for 6 consecutive weeks without other acne treatments. At every visit, treatment evaluations were performed using a modified Global Acne Grading Score (mGAGS), acne quality of life (QOL) questionnaire, Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale (WBPRS) assessments, and clinical photography. Improvement in acne symptoms was observed for both treatment procedures without significant differences and with minimal side effects. Salicylic acid 30% peel and PBBL were well tolerated in our study, and both clinical procedures were efficacious and well-tolerated by the patients.

Thuangtong R,  Tangjaturonrusamee C,  Rattanaumpawan P,  Ditre CM

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